About GERD

Cinclus Pharma AB

Trädgårdsgatan 54

431 35 Mölndal

SWEDEN

info@cincluspharma.com

Kjell Andersson, CEO

+46 733 337 906


Peter Unge, CMO

+46 705 763 780

Copyright © All Rights Reserved

About gastroesophageal reflux disease

Gastric acid belongs in the stomach

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a digestive disorder where gastric acid unintentionally flows into the esophagus. In contrast to the stomach, the lining of the esophagus is not resistant to acid. Hence, acid reflux can cause severe pain, difficulty in swallowing and esophageal erosions or ulcerations (esophagitis).

A debilitating disease

The fact that GERD related pain is often referred for as “heartburn” illustrates its intensity. Patients referred for emergency care under suspicion of a heart attack are sometimes shown to suffer from GERD. Symptoms often occur at night, causing difficulties to sleep which can in turn impact quality-of-life.

"...not even the acid blocking properties of PPIs are sufficient to help all patients – acid breakthroughs occur daily during therapy and the full onset of action takes days."

Former leaps forward in GERD treatment have paved the way for several blockbuster drugs

The medical treatment of GERD and esophagitis basically consists of drugs that reduce the amount of gastric acid. Over the years, more and more efficacious therapies have been introduced. In the late seventies and early eighties, H2 blockers like Tagamet and Zantac became top-selling drugs based on their superiority over antacids. In the late eighties and nineties, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Losec and Nexium swiped the market based on their superiority over H2 blockers. But not even the acid blocking properties of PPIs are sufficient to help all patients – acid breakthroughs occur daily during therapy and the full onset of action takes days.

Wilder Smith C et al, (2001).

"Cinlcus, data on file"

Today’s GERD medications have significant shortcomings

Today's most efficient GERD therapies, leave patients exposed to acid reflux for substantial parts of the day. Approximately 40 percent (Crawley et al, 2000) of patients treated with PPI were not satisfied with their treatment.  More than 35 percent of patients with severe esophagitis (grades C or D) are not healed despite standard high dose  PPI treatment schedule.